15 Bad Email Closing Lines Jeapordising Your Sales

Bad email closing lines can seriously jeapordise your sales.

Why? Because it’s the last thing that your prospect will read and, according to research, it’s the most memorable part of your email.

If you want to make a convincing sales pitch and leave a good impression with your prospect, avoid using these 15 bad closing lines.

 

(1) Would you be interested in arranging a chat?

Why is it a bad closing line?

Any question which sets itself up for an answer of “no.” isn’t a great closing line. Every salesperson thinks their product is worth buying, which is why they often assume a “yes” is coming, even if it isn’t. This line is vague – when do you want to talk? When are you free? Make sure your prospect has to do as little work as possible. Don’t get stuck in a to-and-fro about when’s good for you, oh I can’t do that time… etc. Not only are you giving the prospect way too much time to cool off, you’re not driving the sale.

What to use instead:

“Are you free next Tuesday at 3pm for a call?”

Why? Proposing a set time and date gives you a chance to get the “yes” answer quicker. Driving the sale means that you control the pace of progress.

 

(2) If you’re not the right person to speak with regarding this matter, can you point me in the right direction?

Why is it a bad closing line?

This is a bad line for two reasons. Firstly, as a salesperson, it’s your job to know whether you’re speaking to the right person or not. With the amount of information available on the web, a quick search will usually give you the right name. Secondly, you’re asking for something for nothing. If you want to be referred to the responsible person, you have to make sure you convince the person you’re speaking to that you can offer real value to their company.

What to use instead:

With our product, [company] will save X% in costs without compromising on quality – I’m sure your colleague would love the chance to deliver these savings for your company. If you could put us in touch, you’d be doing both of us a big favour.

Why? A benefit + making the person in front of you feel like they have the power/authority to facilitate a good deal for their colleague = win/win.

 

(3) I hope to hear from you at your earliest convenience!

Why is it a bad closing line?

It assumes that the prospect is prepared to contact you as soon as they have some spare time. You’re almost certainly going to negatively impact your chances with a prospect if you take this approach. Avoid unless you want to come across arrogant and presumptuous. Remember, it’s not their job to chase you up when they’re free. It’s your job to arrange a time to speak that suits both sides.

What to use instead:

Are you free tomorrow at 10am for a quick chat? If that doesn’t work, I can do any time on Friday or between 12 – 4 Monday.

Why? Give the prospect set window to improve your chances of hearing back. This approach shows that you’re flexible and are willing to accommodate the prospect.

bad email closing lines

(4) If you want to deal with [challenge], we’ve got the perfect solution for you.

Why is it a bad closing line?

Any salesperson who tries to suggest that they have the “perfect” solution is automatically considered a liar. It’s nothing personal, but it’s just too rare that any solution will ever be totally perfect, unless it’s bespoke to each customer’s needs. Even then, can you guarantee that you will meet every need they have? Exaggeration won’t do you any favours here. Your best chance at being taken seriously is to be genuine with the customer.

What to use instead:

With our product, [challenge] will be much less of a problem for your company.

Why? If you start talking about perfect solutions, you run the risk of the prospect switching off. But, by being more realistic about the results they can expect, you’re more likely to maintain their focus.

 

(5) So, can I put you down for the X model?

Why is it a bad closing line?

Firstly, it’s presumptuous, which can backfire on you if you haven’t gained the prospect’s trust yet. Secondly, if you ask a question that may receive an answer of “no” (no matter how much you believe will be answered “yes”) you run the risk of shutting the sale down. The key is to gauge the prospect and establish whether they would react positively to this brave close.

What to use instead:

From what you’ve told me today, the X model is the most appropriate model for your needs.

Why? If the prospect doesn’t look like they’d react well, you need to take a more cautious approach. You can then judge their response to the product suggestion to decide whether it’d pay off to push the sale.

 

(6) We would be thrilled to have you as a customer!

Why is it a bad closing line?

Using “we” instead of “I” creates distance between you and the prospect. Using the personal “I” will feel more genuine, which will help you to build trust and rapport with your prospect. Another issue is the use of the word “thrilled”. It isn’t a term that’s used in everyday conversation, and this formality can result in you driving a bigger distance instead of building trust.

What to use instead:

From everything you’ve told me [name], I’m positive our product/service will benefit you and your company. It’d be a pleasure to work with you, and I’d personally be really pleased to have you as a customer.

Why? By reiterating the fact that the prospect will benefit from buying from you, you strengthen your close. Using the personal “I”, a more natural choice of words and the prospect’s name all make the sentiment feel genuine rather than rehearsed.

 

(7) If you buy from us today, you’d make my day!

Why is it a bad closing line?

Put simply, this line makes the sales all about you. At the end of the day, making you happy is not a good enough reason for them to part with their money. Instead, you need to forget the emotional ploys and focus on making the sale all about the prospect. Explain to them what they will get out of buying from you today, because that’s your best chance at genuinely convincing them.

What to use instead:

If you buy from us today, you’ll see a minimum of 35% reduction in your costs by the end of next week.

Why? A real, tangible benefit to the prospect is a much better outcome for their purchase. You could even offer a money-back guarantee (if your company allows it) to build trust and show your confidence in your product/service.

 

(8) I’m absolutely positive that we will meet your every need.

Why is it a bad closing line?

As I mentioned in point 4 above, it’s extremely unlikely that you will be able to meet every need your prospect has. If you suggest that you can, you run the risk that the prospect will see straight through your hyperbole. Don’t exaggerate. If you’ve done your research well, you’ll know what the biggest challenges they’re facing are. Focus on how you can help them overcome these challenges specifically.

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What to use instead:

With our product/service, you’ll be able to overcome the challenges you’ve been facing in [area 1], [area 2] and [area 3].

Why? Repeating their main challenges shows that you’ve been paying attention to what the prospect needs the most. Applying your solution to their problems is more genuine and more convincing.

 

(9) Shall I put you down for the 1.1 model or the 2.1 model?

Why is it a bad closing line?

This line is incredibly assumptive, similarly to point 5 above. When used at the wrong time, it’s guaranteed to damage your sales pitch. If you are 100% clear that the prospect is ready to buy, then you should use a similar approach to finalise the details of your sale. But, if they seem to be on the fence about buying, don’t risk it.

What to use instead:

This product will increase your revenue by 40% based on your current practices – this is the difference between our two models. I think model 2.1 is best suited to your needs – would you agree?

Why? A benefit helps convince your prospect, and the more subtle approach of which product is most suited to their individual needs will make them reach a decision without putting any pressure on them.

bad email closing lines

(10) Please give me a call when you get the chance!

Why is it a bad closing line?

This line is bad for a couple of reasons. 1) It’s making more work for the prospect, which is off-putting. Remember, it’s your job to do the legwork if you want to get a sale. 2) It’s too vague – how can the prospect know when is a good time for you? If they call and you miss it, the process of back-and-forth is going to make the whole process take much longer.

What to use instead:

Are you free any time on Monday or Tuesday this week for a quick chat on the phone?

Why? Specifying a window makes it easier and quicker to finalise a time to talk, and offering to call them minimises the work you’re making the prospect do.

 

(11) Is our product something you’d be interested in?

Why is it a bad closing line?

This question is asking the prospect to do too much. Rather than asking them to consider the features of your product, the degree to which it may fit their needs and then decide whether they want to buy your product in particular – do the work for them. Explain why your product/service is a good fit for their requirements, and why they should go with you instead of your competitors. You still need to ask for the sale, but don’t rush into it without making their decision as easy as possible.

What to use instead:

So, as you can see, working with our product will help you overcome [challenge] and achieve [goal]. Are there any questions you have that I haven’t answered, or shall we move onto pricing?

Why? Progressing the sale without being pushy is crucial. Give the prospect the feeling that they are in control of moving the conversation along, rather than pressuring them into making a final decision too soon.

 

(12) I’d love to tell you more about our company and the products/services we offer.

Why is it a bad closing line?

When it comes down to it, the prospect is unlikely to have the time or care enough to hear about your company’s history, mission or product range. Unless there are details that are relevant to the sale and will help you in converting the prospect (e.g. if they are an environmentally-friendly company and your company has introduced a new green policy), don’t go down this road. Stick to the most relevant product, and make your pitch as concise as you can.

What to use instead:

When it comes to managing your challenges, I’d recommend model X, because…

Why? Your company is not as important to the prospect as their challenges, so focus on learning what they are and how your products can solve them.

 

(13) Thanks in advance!

Why is it a bad closing line?

Thanking the prospect before they’ve even decided to buy from you is both presumptive and off-putting. Not only have they not bought from you yet, they haven’t even agreed to do so. Even if it’s used with good intentions, you’re more likely to end up leaving the prospect less inclined to continue with the purchase. It’s best to try a safer alternative.

What to use instead:

Thanks for taking the time to consider our solutions. Let’s arrange a time to talk further – how’s Monday at 4pm?

Why? Thank them for something they’ve actually done, which in this case, is that they’ve allocated some of their time to read your email. Close strong with a suggested time to continue your conversation to boost your chances of progressing the sale.

 

(14) If you buy today, I’ll even arrange a 10% discount for you!

Why is it a bad closing line?

Throwing something in for free or offering a discount at this stage won’t do you any favours. Not only will it undermine the value of your product/service, more savvy prospects will know to hold out a little longer to get an even bigger discount. The merits of your product should be enough to close the sale. If they aren’t, perhaps the prospect you’re speaking to is not your ideal customer. Even if they are a strong potential customer, offering discounts can lead to a lower perceived value and a lack of confidence in you and your product.

What to use instead:

Nothing! Avoid this line. Instead, focus on using a strong closing line to close the deal.

 

(15) What will it take to convince you to buy from me today?

Why is it a bad closing line?

This particular thought process can come across as desperate or pleading, which is not the best impression to be giving your prospect. For one thing, you can’t force someone into committing to a sale if they aren’t completely ready. And secondly, if they are ready to buy, you need to focus on convincing them with a strong sales pitch – not by asking them how to make them buy. You’ll make the prospect feel like all you care about is closing the sale, rather than about them and their needs.

What to use instead:

[Name], I’m positive that our product is going to help you overcome [challenges] you face. You can start enjoying the more streamlined process today, if you’re ready to move forward.

Why? Convince your prospect based on the benefits they will receive, and make the sale all about them.

 

Have you come across or even used any closing lines that have backfired? Share your thoughts and experiences in the comments section below!

4 Comments

  1. Abdul Muneeb

    Hey Zerin,

    Great post, loved the new ideas of Email closing lines.

    Have a Good Day 🙂

    1. Zerin

      Thanks Abdul! I’m glad you enjoyed the post 🙂

  2. Salesworld

    Hey
    Great Ideas..Thanks for sharing.. (Y)

    1. Zerin

      Thanks for reading!

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